urbanus vulgaris

urban life & culture / ideas & insights / innovation & development

Category: TED

Retrofitting suburbia

by gailiute

This is quite an interesting talk on the possible futures of suburbia. I really liked her statement, which goes something like “urbanism does its job, we only have to make architecture to look better” :D

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Why you will fail to have a great career

by gailiute

Well this is definitely one of the funniest and the most inspiring talks i heard recently!

Failed Architecture platform

by gailiute

Though it does not explain much about Failed Architecture platform, this video gives nice short overview about the position of the architect in the  minds of society.

Immersive ugliness of everyday’s environment in America

by gailiute

Such a good talk. And very hilarious :)

Our future cities. Cradle to cradle design

by gailiute

 

For those, who have read Cradle to cradle, this talk will be a repetition of ideas from the book.

For those, who haven’t read it – please do so :)

Taking back the city – One of the most recent inspiring talks

by gailiute

At the beginning of this talk I was a bit sceptical hearing the claims such as “the colours decreased the crime rate”, “citizens started belonging to the place”, etc. Because I thought it’s a bit nonsense. Nonetheless, the more I heard, the more I am convinced that every word from this politician and a man is 100% true. Of course it is not only the colours that changed the situation in the city; he managed to do some pretty incredible things for citizens well-being in the last twenty years too: clearing riverbanks and giving back to public, creating lots of parks, planting trees, demolishing illegal constructions, diminishing corruption in the administration level, bringing green tax in action (and what is more important – achieving that everybody pays it) and as I understood many others.

I highly recommend to view this talk to get a good dose of optimism and inspiration. And I really want Kaunas would have at least half of this politician! Imagine, then it finally would become a real city! :D

Here are some images of painted Tirana:

http://blog.ted.com/2013/02/08/9-views-of-tirana-albania-with-its-bright-multicolored-building/

We could argue that it looks odd, childish, stupid, etc. However I think that it is better like this, then like nothing is done.

Cheers!

A self-healing asphalt

by gailiute

Paved roads are nice to look at, but they’re easily damaged and costly to repair. Erik Schlangen demos a new type of porous asphalt made of simple materials with an astonishing feature: When cracked, it can be “healed” by induction heating. (Filmed at TEDxDelft.)

Smart failure or the world after midnight

by gailiute

The world is changing much more rapidly than most people realize, says business educator Eddie Obeng — and creative output cannot keep up. In this spirited talk, he highlights three important changes we should understand for better productivity, and calls for a stronger culture of “smart failure.”

Why you should listen to him:

Because he knows how to fail and be rewarded for that! :)

 

on ted: http://www.ted.com/talks/eddie_obeng_smart_failure_for_a_fast_changing_world.html

Designing for experience, not for appearance

by gailiute

 

Because of poor acoustics, students in classrooms miss 50 percent of what their teachers say and patients in hospitals have trouble sleeping because they continually feel stressed. Julian Treasure sounds a call to action for designers to pay attention to the “invisible architecture” of sound.

Julian Treasure is the chair of the Sound Agency, a firm that advises worldwide businesses — offices, retailers, hotels — on how to use sound. He asks us to pay attention to the sounds that surround us. How do they make us feel: productive, stressed, energized, acquisitive?

Responsive cities: sharing capabilities

by gailiute

I just fell in love with the small folding responsive car ;)

How can we fit more people into cities without overcrowding? Kent Larson shows off folding cars, quick-change apartments and other innovations that could make the city of the future work a lot like a small village of the past.

Kent Larson has been the director of the MIT House_n  research consortium in the School of Architecture and Planning since 1998 and is also the current director of the MIT Media Lab’s Changing Places group. Both projects are dedicated to developing technologies that solve contemporary issues in the home, the workplace, and the city. Larson practiced architecture in New York City for 15 years and wrote for several architectural publications and the New York Times. In 2000, his book, Louis I. Kahn: Unbuilt Masterworks, was selected among the Ten Best Books in Architecture by the New York Times Review of Books. His current work has three focusses: responsive urban housing, ubiquitous technologies, and living lab experiments to test his group’s designs in practical environments.

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