urbanus vulgaris

urban life & culture / ideas & insights / innovation & development

Category: urban ecology

Becoming local

by gailiute

Rasa Anaityte shared a nice reminder-documentary film about how our societal habits became so mass production/ artificial and unhealthy, that buying and eating local food is such fascinating thing to do, instead of being obvious (thank God we still have grandmas and grandpas in the villages and  cherry and apple trees in summer gardens in Lithuania :P :)

Description:

Do you know where your food comes from?

In the past ten years, the organic food industry has become big business and consumers have been left wondering exactly what the word “Organic” means and how they can really know what they’re eating.

With the rise of farmer’s markets and more and more chefs sourcing their ingredients from local farms, consumers are now able to meet and talk to the people who are growing their food.

LOCAL discusses the rise of the local food movement, the challenges of sourcing locally and how it’s become a growing part of the Austin, Texas food scene.

This documentary is the November film in my 12 Films Project, where I make one short film every month in 2011. To see the other films or to learn more about the project, visit the website at:

12filmsproject.com

Jeremy Rifkin: A New Era of Capitalism

by vytasvulgaris

Jeremy Rifkin about the current global development trends and “the third  industrial revolution”. About the emerging new political order, about the new generations of social entrepreneurs, about survival of human race etc.

Some more of Rifkin’s quite fascinating anthropological concept – Empathic Civilization (RSA Animate)

Bonnington Square

by vytasvulgaris

 

A docummentary film directed by Alistair Oldham

“Bonnington Square is right in the heart of London, just two minutes walk from the river and just ten minutes from the Houses of Parliament. In the early eighties the one hundred houses of the Square were all squatted, forming a bohemian community from all around the world.The squat had two community gardens, a cafe, a wholefood shop, a nightclub, a newsletter and even a milkbar. Although it is no longer squatted, there are still many low rent housing cooperatives, and the cafe and the gardens are still collectively run, and the Square is now a model of a modern sustainable urban community” (http://vimeo.com/36595608).

SpontaneousInterventions: design actions for the common good

by vytasvulgaris

“SpontaneousInterventions: design actions for the common good is the theme of the U.S. Pavilion at the 13th International Venice Architecture Biennale (Fall 2012). In recent years, there has been a nascent movement of designers acting on their own initiative to solve problematic urban situations, creating new opportunities and amenities for the public. Provisional, improvisational, guerrilla, unsolicited, tactical, temporary, informal, DIY, unplanned, participatory, opensource—these are just a few of the words that have been used to describe this growing body of work.” http://www.spontaneousinterventions.org/about

Picture: http://www.envelopead.com/proj_octaviakl.html
http://www.spontaneousinterventions.org/project/proxy

Poo WiFi

by vytasvulgaris

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8_KNPKWmsA

“One company that specializes in picking up dog droppings, Doody Calls, recently estimated that American dogs alone let go of 10 million tons of dog poop a year. The company also found that 40 per cent of dog owners don’t pick up their pets’ poop at all. In Mexico City, this issue has prompted a campaign by advertising agency DDB Mexico with a Pavlovian-style notion: Offer free Wi-Fi in public areas every time owners put dog poop into a particular bin. Though the video above looks like a satire, it’s a very real initiative being rolled out in 10 parks across the city in partnership with Mexican Internet portal Terra. Owners bag the poop, put it in a bin where it gets weighed, and the park receives free Wi-Fi for the time garnered by the amount deposited (usually a few minutes). Though meant for ‘doggie bags,’ the company told Creativity Online they’re fine with people putting other trash into the bin — after all, either way it keeps the area clean” http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/04/24/dog-poo-wifi_n_1448512.html .


Brussels Express

by vytasvulgaris

 

A fresh 19 min documentary by Sander Vandenbroucke about why traffic in Brussels is a tragedy, about  success of pioneer bike messengers and about insights and tips from the major of Copenhagen.

http://www.brusselsexpressfilm.be/

The Netherlands a Manufactured Landscape

by svoosten

Following the posts ‘Manufactured landscapes’ and ‘Who’s your neighbor’ I would like to recommend the series ‘Nederland van Boven’ by the VPRO, that captures impressive imagery of the Netherlands and combines it with attractive data visualizations. Providing insight in the daily though sometimes not ordinary ‘organisation’ of the urban, industrial and cultural landscapes of the Netherlands.

For those whomwere not already convinced, this series will make you understand that the title ‘manufactured landscape’ could also rightly be applied to the Netherlands, or at least to the Rotterdam Harbor, an exemplary case study when it comes to the man- made landscape.

http://nederlandvanboven.vpro.nl/afleveringen/handel-video.html

Manufactured Landscapes (2006) by Jennifer Baichwal

by vytasvulgaris

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEOe27xXhVU

“The film follows Burtynsky to China as he travels the country photographing the evidence and effects of that country’s massive industrial revolution. Sites such as the Three Gorges Dam, which is bigger by 50% than any other dam in the world and displaced over a million people, factory floors over a kilometre long, and the breathtaking scale of Shanghai’s urban renewal are subjects for his lens and our motion picture camera.

Shot in Super-16mm film, Manufactured Landscapes extends the narrative streams of Burtynsky’s photographs, allowing us to meditate on our profound impact on the planet and witness both the epicentres of industrial endeavour and the dumping grounds of its waste. What makes the photographs so powerful is his refusal in them to be didactic. We are all implicated here, they tell us: there are no easy answers. The film continues this approach of presenting complexity, without trying to reach simplistic judgements or reductive resolutions. In the process, it tries to shift our consciousness about the world and the way we live in it.” (http://www.edwardburtynsky.com/)

Edward Burtynsky: Exploring the Residual Landscape

by vytasvulgaris

“Nature transformed through industry is a predominant theme in my work. I set course to intersect with a contemporary view of the great ages of man; from stone, to minerals, oil, transportation, silicon, and so on. To make these ideas visible I search for subjects that are rich in detail and scale yet open in their meaning. Recycling yards, mine tailings, quarries and refineries are all places that are outside of our normal experience, yet we partake of their output on a daily basis.” (Edward Burtynsky)
http://www.edwardburtynsky.com/

The tale of two regions [London – Randstad]

by tadas jonauskis

Two regions are compared to find out similarities and possible solutions to the problems that they are facing. It is very different challenges from the growing cities. It tries to to see how to retain a high quality of life while still promoting economic growth, how to modernize and regionalize their transportation systems, how to make the shift towards sustainable energy and food production and how to keep alive regional identity and local democracy in a rapidly globalizing world.

The research was done by LSE Cities, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency and the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment.

More information could be found here:
http://urban-age.net/publications/reports/2011/the-tale-of-two-regions/

Download full report 

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