urbanus vulgaris

urban life & culture / ideas & insights / innovation & development

Category: knowledge resource

Monocle 24 radio – The Urbanist show

by gailiute

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This is great stuff: radio station with the show about the cities for everybody who love cities, want to live in cities, move out of cities or just want to listen to smth that even might be interesting ;)

http://monocle.com/radio/shows/the-urbanist/

Highly recommend to listen!

P.s. they have more interesting shows, check them out

 

Today is a great day to publish an insight on creativity.

by jiookrednav

150104_John Cleese on creativity

Well I started to get interested in creativity about thirty years ago, because I went to a conference at Cambridge and I started reading the research and I started comparing it with my own experience and I got very, very interested in it and I also got interested in the fact, that basically once you’ve established one or two principles, that’s all you can say about it, because to sum up something I sometimes take three hours to say:

All creativity comes from the unconscious. If creativity came from logic and intelligence, then all the logical and intelligent people could do it. But they can’t. It all boils down to getting to a playful and relaxed frame of mind. Most of it has to do with relaxation, because unless you’re relaxed you can’t hear the promptings from the unconscious.

Nobody ever had a bright idea when they were attacking a machine-gun-nest. You see what I mean? If you’re occupied with activity -and that is one of the reasons why there’s so little creativity at the moment, because nobody gets any peace any more, because these damn things are ringing all the time, and beep there and you know. You sit down, another e-mail comes in. It’s absolutely poison, because interruptions and anxiety will kill any kind of creativity.

You have to get in an atmosphere where you’re a little bit in a cocoon of you’re own, you close the door or you go sit in the park and you just stay quiet and for 20 minutes nothing happens, because you can only think of the things you ought to be doing: You know, people you forgot to telephone…, so you have to have a little notebook and you write those down and after 20 minutes, the mind starts to calm down, just as it does in meditation, it’s almost an identical process. And then if you start thinking about the subject, not too hard, you don’t want to get tense, play with the thought, and you get little ideas start popping up, but if you’re mind is full of, zoom, zoom beep, beep, you’ll never hear those little ideas, it’ll be drowned out you see what I mean?

This remarkable insight was explained by John Cleese in this interview, starting at about 52 minutes: http://www.npo.nl/college-tour-special-john-cleese/25-12-2014/VPWON_1234760

And here’s some more from Cleese on this blog:

As well as identifying that ideas and breakthroughs percolate in the deep recesses of our brain, Cleese talked about some of the key, practical traits of truly creative people. In doing so he told a story of Brian Bates, a psychology professor at Sussex University. Intrigued by how the creative mind works, Bates chose to study the work practices of architects, because the profession required the combination of two brains in the creation of beautifully groundbreaking yet structurally sound buildings.

“He did a very simple test. He asked various architects to name who, in their opinion, were the most creative architects in the field. He then asked those creative architects to tell him what they do from the moment they wake up to the moment they go to bed. He then went to the uncreative architects—without perhaps explaining that’s why he was talking to them—and asked them the same thing. Then he compared the two. He discovered two differences, and neither was to do with intelligence.”

“The first thing he discovered is that the creative architects knew how to play. They could get immersed in a problem. It was almost childlike, like when a child gets utterly absorbed in a problem. The second thing was that they deferred making decisions as long as they could. This is surprising.”

“If you have a decision to make, what is the single most important question to ask yourself? I believe it’s ‘when does this decision have to be made’? When most of us have a problem that’s a little bit unresolved, we’re a little bit uncomfortable. We want to resolve it. The creative architects had this tolerance for this discomfort we all feel when we leave things unresolved.”

“Why would those two things be importance? The playfulness is because in that moment of childlike play, you’re much more in touch with your unconscious. The second is that when you defer decisions as long as possible, it’s giving your unconscious the maximum amount of time to come up with something.”

Summing it up, he narrows it down to 5 Lessons in this lecture (transcript here). “Creativity is not a talent, it’s a way of operating”:

150104_John Cleese on creativity 02

  1. Space (“You can’t become playful, and therefore creative, if you’re under your usual pressures.”)
  2. Time (“It’s not enough to create space; you have to create your space for a specific period of time.”)
  3. Time (“Giving your mind as long as possible to come up with something original,” and learning to tolerate the discomfort of pondering time and indecision.)
  4. Confidence (“Nothing will stop you being creative so effectively as the fear of making a mistake.”)
  5. Humor (“The main evolutionary significance of humor is that it gets us from the closed mode to the open mode quicker than anything else.”)

 

Jeremy Rifkin: A New Era of Capitalism

by vytasvulgaris

Jeremy Rifkin about the current global development trends and “the third  industrial revolution”. About the emerging new political order, about the new generations of social entrepreneurs, about survival of human race etc.

Some more of Rifkin’s quite fascinating anthropological concept – Empathic Civilization (RSA Animate)

Good.is

by gailiute

Though I found this page accidentally and intended to add it as a nice and very clearly done example of website in the info graphics post, I decided that it is worth to pay your attention to it a bit more.

I think it is great platform for sharing ideas and issues that people care about.

And pay attention how amazingly it plays with words in the website address line: ” good is everyone” ;)

“GOOD is a global community of people who give a damn.”

 

http://www.good.is/everyone

Smart failure or the world after midnight

by gailiute

The world is changing much more rapidly than most people realize, says business educator Eddie Obeng — and creative output cannot keep up. In this spirited talk, he highlights three important changes we should understand for better productivity, and calls for a stronger culture of “smart failure.”

Why you should listen to him:

Because he knows how to fail and be rewarded for that! :)

 

on ted: http://www.ted.com/talks/eddie_obeng_smart_failure_for_a_fast_changing_world.html

100 artists in one

by gailiute

 

How do you stage an international art show with work from 100 different artists? If you’re Shea Hembrey, you invent all of the artists and artwork yourself — from large-scale outdoor installations to tiny paintings drawn with a single-haired brush. Watch this funny, mind-bending talk to see the explosion of creativity and diversity of skills a single artist is capable of.

Shea Hembrey explores patterns from nature and myth. A childhood love of nature, and especially birdlife, informs his vision. Full bio »

 

What I find the most intriguing  from this talk is 5 definitions of the art that are presented by Shea. You may say its the matter of taste whether  an object can be called art or not, however Shea´s definitions brings really a lot of clarity in defining contemporary art. Well, at least for me :)

A novel idea for cleaning up oil spills

by gailiute

When TED Senior Fellow Cesar Harada heard about the devastating effects of the BP Oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, he quit his dream job and moved to New Orleans to develop a more efficient way to soak up the oil. He designed a highly maneuverable, flexible boat capable of cleaning large tracts quickly. But rather than turn a profit, he has opted to open-source the design.

 

 

Platform for fixing the city

by gailiute

One of the most interesting and most difficult challenges that we are constantly willing to take is how to make cities vibrant, liveable, prosperous, attractive, etc., etc. There are already many attempts made indeed. Some of them more successful, some less. Since it is better to learn from other mistakes than from your own, IDEO, Michigan-based iconic design firm, (steelcase producer) created an open platform called  OpenIDEO to foster the best sustainability solutions and to apply them to revitalize city of Detroit (or any other city).

The idea (and possibly success of this platform) is  to engage a diverse group of individuals (ecologists, designers, writers, sociologists, economists, etc) for a design challenge. Issuing  challenge invites anyone and anywhere to submit ideas. But it is not simply community voting or judging that makes the crowd-sourcing work. It is a multi-step process of collectively winnowing down the ideas while simultaneously improving them.

But OpenIDEO is more than that. Beyond its obvious do-good nature it has real business benefits to both IDEO and, in this instance, Steelcase.

Through selection, 11 winning ideas were selected from almost 900 inspirations. Here are  all 11 of the winners. I suggest to check it out and be inspired !

Official page of OpenIDEO : http://www.openideo.com/

Found in: greenbiz.com

Networked society – Thinking cities

by tadas jonauskis

Google has its own TED

by alfredas

A forum to encourage and amplify technology-based moonshot thinking and teamwork.
Check out: http://www.wesolveforx.com/

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